3 Common Influencer Marketing Mistakes (and how to avoid them!)

17.08.2020 Trends & Strategy

Influencer marketing is becoming more and more advanced as brands are discovering the success they can achieve through activating powerful creators. 3.6 billion of us are active social media users, and this figure is set to explode to 4.4 billion by 2023. These are huge markets to be won or lost by getting your influencer marketing strategy just right!

Over the years, we’ve observed many mistakes and missed opportunities made in the industry. We’ve outlined the top 3 most common influencer campaign mistakes so you don’t make them!

1. Believing bigger is always better

It can be tempting to reach out to the influencer with the biggest audience you can find — the larger the reach, the greater the impressions, the bigger the reward, right? Not necessarily!

Before engaging an influencer, it's important to focus on their audience statistics. Which country do their followers originate from? What are the gender ratios and age profile of that audience? For example, let's say your choice of brand ambassador content creator has 100 million followers. If their audience demographic is 67% female aged between 24-34 and largely based in the US, but your campaign is targeting 18-24 year old European males, then months of planning a fantastic product with a great campaign concept might fall flat at the last minute because their audience aren’t likely to convert, despite a high impression count. Mistargeting is at the root of many underperforming campaigns.

2. Not diversifying your influencer mix

Just as maximising your impressions doesn’t necessarily correlate to a high level of conversions, spending all your social media budget on one or two very high profile influencers isn’t necessarily your most efficient ROI. Many brands are having enormous success with a micro-influencer strategy.

Micro-influencers are individuals that have between 10,000 - 50,000 followers who are considered experts in their respective niche. They could be a food blogger, photographer, traveller, a local fashionista, or a fitness guru… just to name a few fields! These smaller, more focused influencers connect on a deeper level with their audience and generate greater engagement. In fact, influencers with 1,000 followers achieve 85% higher engagement rate than those with an audience of 100,000: as the number of followers increases the engagement tends to decrease. Followers see these micro-influencers as more accessible — more like friends — and are twice as likely to trust the recommendation. It may well be that a micro-influencer strategy will achieve a better performance for your campaign.

3. Not trusting the creator

Managing an influencer’s creative freedom with the expectations of the brand is an important balance — that’s why a good briefing is important. However, once you’ve aligned on campaign goals and brand values, a key mistake is not listening to the influencer’s unique point of view. Influencers are experts in creating beautiful content: that’s why you hired them after all! At the end of the day, the content creators know their audience best, and therefore know what will resonate and what won’t. If posts do not feel authentic to the influencer they will not perform well, marking a lost opportunity to capture followers’ attention.

Influencer Marketing has to be an integral part of any brand’s marketing mix. In comparison to traditional marketing strategies, influencer marketing is much more cost efficient because it allows you to directly target your desired audience by partnering with creators who have audiences suitable for your campaign, and know how to generate stunning pieces of advertising. To ensure a robust, long term marketing strategy, reach out to us.

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